FÁTIMA
AXKAUIA
FÁTIMA
AXKAUIA

The Catacombs

June 17, 2022 to July 23, 2022

In the exhibition AXKAUIA, Chicago-based artist FÁTIMA lights up the Catacombs from June 17 to July 23 with sculptures made of neon and steel.

The AXKAUIA series represents the physical, mental and spiritual notions of abundance. Each piece is inspired by maize and what it represents. Maize has historically been a symbol of abundance in cultures across the Americas. Axkauia is a Nahuatl word (Nahuatl being one of the original Mexican languages) meaning to abound or of abundance. FÁTIMA is able to use these visual and linguistic references to maize as a tool to not only illuminate the room but also enlighten viewers. Connecting symbolism that honors her Mexican heritage with contemporary notions of culture, self and the spiritual, AXKAUIA invites you to take part in a world of abundance.

Register for the free opening reception of AXKAUIA on June 17 from 6 – 9pm at the link below. for more information or any sales inquiries, email us at art@epiphanychi.com.

Register Here
Plan Your Visit
about the artist
About FÁTIMA

FÁTIMA is a Mexican artist who was also raised in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Loyola University in New Orleans and spent a few years thereafter creating art in a communal shotgun studio and curating pop-up exhibitions. Currently, she is pursuing her Master of Fine Arts degree in Sculpture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. FÁTIMA uses art as a ritual tool to connect with self, society, and the sacred.

About FÁTIMA

FÁTIMA is a Mexican artist who was also raised in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Loyola University in New Orleans and spent a few years thereafter creating art in a communal shotgun studio and curating pop-up exhibitions. Currently, she is pursuing her Master of Fine Arts degree in Sculpture at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. FÁTIMA uses art as a ritual tool to connect with self, society, and the sacred.