Thank You Goodbye
A Columbia College Chicago Alumni Showcase
Thank You Goodbye
A Columbia College Chicago Alumni Showcase

The Sacristy Gallery at Epiphany Center for the Arts

September 2, 2022 to October 15, 2022

Thank You Goodbye showcases the work of five emerging Chicago-based artists: Micaela Felix, Darby Jack, Nadia Khan, Psymon and SEAH. These artists were selected for the opportunity to show their work together in the Sacristy Gallery from a juried open call. Offered to Columbia College Chicago Alumni from the past four years who graduated from the Art and Art History Department with a BA or BFA, the exhibition that was developed from this process spans painting, printmaking, sculpture and poetry.

Curated by Epiphany Center for the Arts, Thank You Goodbye encapsulates both the gratitude and farewells that often accompany the experience of transitioning from student to working artist and honors the work that lives in this time of in-between. The perspectives of young artists working in the early stages of their career are dynamic and singular, a preview into the next generation of creative voices. The imagery and materials used throughout this exhibition call attention to this fact, challenging the viewer to linger a little longer, and to appreciate the upheaval inherent in youth.

To attend the closing reception of Thank You Goodbye on Saturday, October 15 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. register at the link below.

Register Here

For more information or to schedule a viewing appointment, please email art@epiphanychi.com.

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About the artist
About the artists

Micaela Felix is an emerging artist and recent graduate of Columbia College Chicago. She is a contemporary painter, whose work embraces both representational and abstract elements in colorful depictions of figures. Her painted works, which feature abstracted images of human forms, often engage in rich colors and animated brushstrokes. Her works draw on the legacies of Williem de Kooning, Joan Mitchell, and many other Abstract Expressionist artists.

Darby Jack is a Chicago based painter, puppeteer, and printmaker. He was born in Birmingham, Alabama and moved to Chicago to study at Columbia College where he graduated with a BFA in Fine Arts. His work aims to create psychological narratives that convey universal and relatable feelings through placing the viewer in unique perspectives.

Nadia Khan is inspired by her own experiences as a bi-racial artist (American and Bangladeshi), covering topics such as race, motherhood, womanhood, and intimacy in her work. Figures are often integrated with flora and fauna. Khan explores different mediums in her practice- painting, collage making, sculpture and embroidery- but her recent aim is to showcase techniques and mediums that are often considered “crafty” or not looked at as “fine art.” She wishes to pay homage to the hardworking women who are overlooked for their skills in making amazing textile art.

Psymon is a life-long Chicagoan who is endlessly fascinated by biology, geology, and the vast gulfs of deep time that these slow processes play out along. Since the development of his thesis work in his final year of undergrad at Columbia College Chicago, he has worked mostly in diorama style models, appropriating the pedagogical language of museums to sculpt scenes that explore our relationship with nature and time, and our legacy in a world massively altered by our own activity.

SEAH is based on the violently stolen land of the Ojibwe, Odawa, and Potawatomi nations, otherwise known as Chicago. They are an interdisciplinary maker recently graduated from Columbia College Chicago, and are attempting to construct a queered identity within their work… throughout the absurd and mass-relatable process of healing from trauma while presently experiencing chaos. Destruction plays a major role as both process and medium in their artwork, as do found and personal objects that lend a keen awareness of immediate reality.

About the artists

Micaela Felix is an emerging artist and recent graduate of Columbia College Chicago. She is a contemporary painter, whose work embraces both representational and abstract elements in colorful depictions of figures. Her painted works, which feature abstracted images of human forms, often engage in rich colors and animated brushstrokes. Her works draw on the legacies of Williem de Kooning, Joan Mitchell, and many other Abstract Expressionist artists.

Darby Jack is a Chicago based painter, puppeteer, and printmaker. He was born in Birmingham, Alabama and moved to Chicago to study at Columbia College where he graduated with a BFA in Fine Arts. His work aims to create psychological narratives that convey universal and relatable feelings through placing the viewer in unique perspectives.

Nadia Khan is inspired by her own experiences as a bi-racial artist (American and Bangladeshi), covering topics such as race, motherhood, womanhood, and intimacy in her work. Figures are often integrated with flora and fauna. Khan explores different mediums in her practice- painting, collage making, sculpture and embroidery- but her recent aim is to showcase techniques and mediums that are often considered “crafty” or not looked at as “fine art.” She wishes to pay homage to the hardworking women who are overlooked for their skills in making amazing textile art.

Psymon is a life-long Chicagoan who is endlessly fascinated by biology, geology, and the vast gulfs of deep time that these slow processes play out along. Since the development of his thesis work in his final year of undergrad at Columbia College Chicago, he has worked mostly in diorama style models, appropriating the pedagogical language of museums to sculpt scenes that explore our relationship with nature and time, and our legacy in a world massively altered by our own activity.

SEAH is based on the violently stolen land of the Ojibwe, Odawa, and Potawatomi nations, otherwise known as Chicago. They are an interdisciplinary maker recently graduated from Columbia College Chicago, and are attempting to construct a queered identity within their work… throughout the absurd and mass-relatable process of healing from trauma while presently experiencing chaos. Destruction plays a major role as both process and medium in their artwork, as do found and personal objects that lend a keen awareness of immediate reality.